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TBG blood test

The TBG blood test measures the level of a protein that moves thyroid hormone throughout your body. This protein is called thyroxine binding globulin (TBG).

How the Test is Performed

A blood sample is taken and then sent to a laboratory for testing.

How to Prepare for the Test

Certain drugs and medicines can affect test results. Your health care provider may tell you to stop taking a certain medicine for a short time before the test. Never stop taking any medicine without first talking to your provider.

These medicines and drugs can increase TBG level:

  • Estrogens, found in birth control pills and estrogen replacement therapy
  • Heroin
  • Methadone
  • Phenothiazines (certain antipsychotic drugs)

The following medicines can decrease TBG levels:

  • Depakote or depakene (also called valproic acid)
  • Dilantin (also called phenytoin)
  • High doses of salicylates, including aspirin
  • Male hormones, including androgens and testosterone
  • Prednisone

How the Test will Feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away.

Why the Test is Performed

This test may be done to diagnose problems with your thyroid.

Normal Results

Normal range is 13 to 39 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL), or 150 to 360 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L).

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or may test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

An increased TBG level may be due to:

Note: TBG levels are normally high in newborns.

Decreased TBG levels may be due to:

Risks

There is little risk involved with having your blood taken. Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Other risks of having blood drawn are slight, but may include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded
  • Multiple punctures to locate veins
  • Hematoma (blood buildup under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

Alternative Names

Serum thyroxine binding globulin; TBG level; Serum TBG level; Hypothyroidism - TBG; Hyperthyroidism - TBG; Underactive thyroid - TBG; Overactive thyroid - TBG

Images

References

Guber HA, Farag AF. Evaluation of endocrine function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 24.

Salvatore D, Davies TF, Schlumberger MJ, Hay ID, Larsen PR. Thyroid physiology and diagnostic evaluation of patients with thyroid disorders. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11.

Review Date 2/22/2018

Updated by: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.