URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/752.html

Roman Chamomile

What is it?

Roman chamomile is a plant. The flowerheads are used to make medicine.

Some people take Roman chamomile by mouth for various digestive disorders including upset stomach (indigestion), nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and intestinal gas (flatulence). It is also commonly applied to the skin for pain and swelling (inflammation) and included as a germ-killer in ointments, creams, and gels used to treat cracked nipples, sore gums, and irritation of the skin. Some people put Roman chamomile in a steam bath and inhale it for sinus inflammation, hay fever, and sore throat. But there is limited scientific evidence to support any of these uses.

In foods and beverages, the essential oil and extract are used for flavoring.

In manufacturing, the volatile oil of Roman chamomile is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes; and to flavor cigarette tobacco. The extract is also used in cosmetics and soaps. Teas have been used as a hair tint and conditioner, and to treat parasitic worm infections.

How effective is it?

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

The effectiveness ratings for ROMAN CHAMOMILE are as follows:

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for...

  • Indigestion.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Painful periods.
  • Sore throat.
  • Sinusitis.
  • Eczema.
  • Wounds.
  • Sore nipples and gums.
  • Liver and gallbladder problems.
  • Frostbite.
  • Diaper rash.
  • Hemorrhoids.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Roman chamomile for these uses.

How does it work?

Roman chamomile contains chemicals that may help to fight cancer and diabetes. But more information is needed.

Are there safety concerns?

Roman chamomile is LIKELY SAFE for most people when used in amounts normally found in foods. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when used in large amounts and, in some people, may cause vomiting.

The essential oil of Roman chamomile is POSSIBLY SAFE when inhaled or applied to the skin. In some people, when it is applied directly to the skin, it can make the skin red and itchy.

Special precautions & warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Roman chamomile is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts during pregnancy. Roman chamomile is believed to cause miscarriages. Not enough is known about the safety of applying it to the skin during pregnancy. Avoid using Roman chamomile if you are pregnant.

It’s also best to avoid Roman chamomile if you are breast-feeding. Not enough is known about how it might affect the nursing infant.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Roman chamomile may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before using Roman chamomile.

Are there interactions with medications?

It is not known if this product interacts with any medicines.

Before taking this product, talk with your health professional if you take any medications.

Are there interactions with herbs and supplements?

There are no known interactions with herbs and supplements.

Are there interactions with foods?

There are no known interactions with foods.

What dose is used?

The appropriate dose of Roman chamomile depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Roman chamomile. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Other names

Anthémis, Anthémis Odorante, Anthemis nobilis, Babuna Ke Phool, Camomille d’Anjou, Camomille Noble, Camomille Romaine, Chamaemelum nobile, Chamomilla, Chamomile, Chamomillae Ramane Flos, English Chamomile, Fleur de Camomille Romaine, Flores Anthemidis, Garden Chamomile, Grosse Kamille, Ground Apple, Huile Essentielle de Camomille Romaine, Low Chamomile, Manzanilla, Manzanilla Romana, Ormenis nobilis, Roman Chamomile Essential Oil, Romische Kamille, Sweet Chamomile, Whig Plant.

Methodology

To learn more about how this article was written, please see the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database methodology.

References

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Last reviewed - 05/18/2018