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IVD gene

isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase
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Normal Function

The IVD gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase. This enzyme plays an essential role in processing proteins obtained from the diet. Normally, the body breaks down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for growth and development. In cells throughout the body, isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase is found within specialized structures called mitochondria. Mitochondria convert energy from food to a form that cells can use.

Isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase helps process a particular amino acid called leucine. Specifically, this enzyme is responsible for the third step in the breakdown of leucine. This step is a chemical reaction that converts a molecule called isovaleryl-CoA to another molecule, 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. Additional chemical reactions convert 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA into molecules that are used for energy.

Health Conditions Related to Genetic Changes

Isovaleric acidemia

Nearly 100 mutations in the IVD gene have been identified in people with isovaleric acidemia. Some of these mutations disrupt the normal function of the enzyme, while other mutations prevent the cell from producing any functional enzyme. As a result, the body is unable to break down leucine properly. Defects in leucine processing allow several potentially harmful substances, including a compound called isovaleric acid, to build up to toxic levels in the body. An accumulation of isovaleric acid causes people with isovaleric acidemia to have a characteristic odor of sweaty feet. The buildup of isovaleric acid and related compounds also damages the brain and nervous system, leading to poor feeding, lack of energy (lethargy), seizures, and the other signs and symptoms of isovaleric acidemia.

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Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

MedlinePlus Genetics provides information about Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

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Other Names for This Gene

  • ACAD2
  • isovaleryl CoA dehydrogenase
  • IVD_HUMAN

Additional Information & Resources

Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry

Scientific Articles on PubMed

Catalog of Genes and Diseases from OMIM

Research Resources

References

  • Ensenauer R, Fingerhut R, Maier EM, Polanetz R, Olgemöller B, Röschinger W, Muntau AC. Newborn screening for isovaleric acidemia using tandem mass spectrometry: data from 1.6 million newborns. Clin Chem. 2011 Apr;57(4):623-6. doi: 10.1373/clinchem.2010.151134. Epub 2011 Feb 18. Citation on PubMed
  • Ensenauer R, Vockley J, Willard JM, Huey JC, Sass JO, Edland SD, Burton BK, Berry SA, Santer R, Grünert S, Koch HG, Marquardt I, Rinaldo P, Hahn S, Matern D. A common mutation is associated with a mild, potentially asymptomatic phenotype in patients with isovaleric acidemia diagnosed by newborn screening. Am J Hum Genet. 2004 Dec;75(6):1136-42. Epub 2004 Oct 14. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central
  • Lin WD, Wang CH, Lee CC, Lai CC, Tsai Y, Tsai FJ. Genetic mutation profile of isovaleric acidemia patients in Taiwan. Mol Genet Metab. 2007 Feb;90(2):134-9. Epub 2006 Oct 4. Citation on PubMed
  • Mohsen AW, Anderson BD, Volchenboum SL, Battaile KP, Tiffany K, Roberts D, Kim JJ, Vockley J. Characterization of molecular defects in isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in patients with isovaleric acidemia. Biochemistry. 1998 Jul 14;37(28):10325-35. Citation on PubMed
  • Vockley J, Ensenauer R. Isovaleric acidemia: new aspects of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2006 May 15;142C(2):95-103. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central
  • Vockley J, Rogan PK, Anderson BD, Willard J, Seelan RS, Smith DI, Liu W. Exon skipping in IVD RNA processing in isovaleric acidemia caused by point mutations in the coding region of the IVD gene. Am J Hum Genet. 2000 Feb;66(2):356-67. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central
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