URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000451.htm

Using an incentive spirometer

An incentive spirometer is a device used to help you keep your lungs healthy after surgery or when you have a lung illness, such as pneumonia. Using the incentive spirometer teaches you how to take slow deep breaths.

Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated and healthy while you heal and helps prevent lung problems, like pneumonia.

How to use an Incentive Spirometer

Many people feel weak and sore after surgery and taking big breaths can be uncomfortable. A device called an incentive spirometer can help you take deep breaths correctly.

By using the incentive spirometer every 1 to 2 hours, or as instructed by your nurse or doctor, you can take an active role in your recovery and keep your lungs healthy.

To use the spirometer:

  • Sit up and hold the device.
  • Place the mouthpiece spirometer in your mouth. Make sure you make a good seal over the mouthpiece with your lips.
  • Breathe out (exhale) normally.
  • Breathe in (inhale) SLOWLY.

A piece in the incentive spirometer will rise as you breathe in.

  • Try to get this piece to rise as high as you can.
  • Usually, there is a marker placed by your doctor that tells you how big of a breath you should take.

A smaller piece in the spirometer looks like a ball or disc.

  • Your goal should be to make sure this ball stays in the middle of the chamber while you breathe in.
  • If you breathe in too fast, the ball will shoot to the top.
  • If you breathe in too slowly, the ball will stay at the bottom.

Hold your breath for 3 to 5 seconds. Then slowly exhale.

Take 10 to 15 breaths with your spirometer every 1 to 2 hours, or as often as instructed by your nurse or doctor.

Other Tips

These tips may be helpful:

  • If you have a surgical cut (incision) in your chest or abdomen, you may need to hold a pillow tightly to your belly while breathing in. This will help ease discomfort.
  • If you do not make the number marked for you, do not get discouraged. You will improve with practice and as your body heals.
  • If you start to feel dizzy or lightheaded, remove the mouthpiece from your mouth and take some normal breaths. Then continue using the incentive spirometer.

Alternative Names

Lung complications - incentive spirometer; Pneumonia - incentive spirometer

References

do Nascimento Junior P, Modolo NS, Andrade S, Guimaraes MM, Braz LG, El Dib R. Incentive spirometry for prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications in upper abdominal surgery. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;(2):CD006058. PMID: 24510642 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24510642.

Kulaylat MN, Dayton MT. Surgical complications. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 12.

Review Date 11/20/2017

Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Related MedlinePlus Health Topics