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Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within a few seconds to a few minutes. It is most often followed by a brief period of drowsiness or confusion. The first febrile seizure is a frightening moment for parents.

Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take care of your child's febrile seizures.

Questions

Will my child have any brain damage from the febrile seizure?

Will my child have any more seizures?

  • Is my child more likely to have a seizure the next time he or she has a fever?
  • Is there anything I can do to prevent another seizure?

Does my child need medicine for seizures? Does my child need to see a provider who takes care of people with seizures?

Do I need to take any safety measures at home to keep my child safe in case there is another seizure?

Do I need to discuss this seizure with my child's teacher? Can my child participate in gym class and recess when my child goes back to school or day care?

Are there any sports activities that my child should not do? Does my child need to wear a helmet for any type of activities?

Will I always be able to tell if my child is having a seizure?

What should I do if my child has another seizure?

  • When should I call 911?
  • After the seizure is over, what should I do?
  • When should I call the doctor?

Alternative Names

What to ask your doctor about febrile seizures

References

Mick NW. Pediatric fever. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 167.

Mikati MA, Hani AJ. Seizures in childhood. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593.

Review Date 2/16/2017

Updated by: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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