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A venogram is a way to look at veins in your body. It uses x-rays and a radiographic contrast material. It is most often used to look at veins in the legs and belly area (abdomen).

Veins are not normally seen in an x-ray. That is why the contrast material is used. The health care provider injects this dye into a vein so it shows up better on x-rays.


Tell your health care provider before the exam if you have diabetes or kidney problems. These conditions increase the risk of injury to the kidney. If you are taking metformin, you need to stop taking this medicine before you get radiographic contrast material. Talk to your doctor before stopping or changing your medicines.

Some people may have an allergy or reaction to the contrast material. Before the procedure, tell your provider about any allergies you may have.

Alternative Names



Gillespie DL, Caliste ZA. Venography. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston W, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 20.

Review Date 4/28/2015

Updated by: Deepak Sudheendra, MD, RPVI, assistant professor of Interventional Radiology & Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, with an expertise in Vascular Interventional Radiology & Surgical Critical Care, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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