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Antithrombin III blood test

Antithrombin III (AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present in your body.

How the Test is Performed

How to Prepare for the Test

Certain medicines may affect the results of the test. Your health care provider may tell you to stop taking certain medicines or reduce their dose before the test. Do not stop taking any medicine before speaking with your doctor.

How the Test will Feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away.

Why the Test is Performed

Your provider may order this test if you have repeated blood clots or if blood thinning medicine does not work.

Normal Results

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Lower-than-normal AT III may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough AT III in your blood, or when there is enough AT III in your blood, but the AT III does not function properly and is less active.

Abnormal results may not show up until you are an adult.

Examples of complications associated with increased blood clotting are:

Lower than normal AT III may be due to:

Higher than normal AT III may be due to:

  • Use of anabolic steroids
  • Bleeding disorder (hemophilia)
  • Kidney transplant
  • Low level of vitamin K

Risks

Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Obtaining a blood sample from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Other risks may include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

Alternative Names

Antithrombin; AT III; AT 3; Functional antithrombin III; Clotting disorder - AT III; DVT - AT III; Deep vein thrombosis - AT III

References

Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Antithrombin III (AT-III) test - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:156-157.

Napolitano M, Schmaier AH, Kessler CM. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 39.

Review Date 5/20/2016

Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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