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Petroleum jelly overdose

Petroleum jelly is a semisolid mixture of fatty substances that are made from petroleum. A common brand name is Vaseline. This article discusses what happens when someone swallows a lot of petroleum jelly or it gets in the eyes.

This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If you or someone you are with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

Poisonous Ingredient

Petroleum jelly (petrolatum) can be harmful if someone swallows it or it gets in the eyes.

Where Found

Petroleum jelly is used in:

  • Some skin care products (including Vaseline)
  • Some eye lubricant ointments

Other products may also contain petroleum jelly.


These symptoms may occur from swallowing a large amount of petroleum jelly:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Coughing
  • Diarrhea
  • Irritation of the throat
  • Shortness of breath

If a large amount of petroleum jelly gets in the eyes or nose, or is used on the skin, the eyes, nose, or skin may become irritated.

If petroleum jelly is aspirated (enters the breathing tube and lungs), symptoms may be more serious and may include:

  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing during activity
  • Chest pain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Fever and chills
  • Night sweats
  • Weight loss

Home Care

Stop using the product.

Do NOT make a person throw up unless poison control or a health care provider tells you to. Inhaling the substance during vomiting can lead to severe problems.

If the product is in the eyes, flush with large amounts of water for at least 15 minutes.

Before Calling Emergency

Have this information ready:

  • Person's age, weight, and condition
  • Name of product (as well as the ingredients and strength, if known)
  • Time it was swallowed or used
  • Amount swallowed or used

Poison Control

Your local poison control center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. This national hotline will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

This is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

What to Expect at the Emergency Room

Take the container with you to the hospital, if possible.

The provider will measure and monitor the person's vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Symptoms will be treated.

Tests that may be done include:

  • Blood and urine tests
  • Chest x-ray
  • ECG (electrocardiogram, or heart tracing)

Treatment may include:

  • Activated charcoal
  • Airway and breathing support (serious cases only)
  • Intravenous fluids (given through a vein)
  • Laxative
  • Medicine to treat symptoms
  • Skin and eye washing if the product touched these tissues and they became irritated or swollen

Outlook (Prognosis)

Petroleum jelly is considered nontoxic. Recovery is likely.

Alternative Names

Vaseline overdose


Aronson JK. Paraffins. In: Aronson JK, ed. Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs. 16th ed. Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2016:494-498.

Meehan TJ. Approach to the poisoned patient. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 139.

Review Date 9/23/2017

Updated by: Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Emeritus, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.