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Minimally invasive hip replacement

Minimally invasive hip replacement is a technique used to perform hip replacement surgeries. It uses a smaller surgical cut. Also, fewer muscles around the hip are cut or detached.

Description

To perform this surgery:

  • A cut will be made in one of three places -- on the back of the hip (over the buttock), on the front of the hip (near the groin), or on the side of the hip.
  • In most cases, the cut will be 3 to 6 inches long. In a regular hip replacement surgery, the cut is 10 to 12 inches long.
  • The surgeon will use special instruments to work through the small cut.
  • Surgery involves cutting and removing bone. The surgeon will remove some muscles and other tissues. Less tissue is removed than in regular surgery. Most of the time, muscles are not cut or detached.

This procedure uses the same type of hip replacement implants as regular surgery.

Why the Procedure is Performed

As in regular surgery, this procedure is done to replace or repair a diseased or damaged hip joint. This technique works better for people who are younger and thinner. Minimally invasive techniques may allow for a quicker recovery and less pain.

You may not qualify for this procedure if

  • Your arthritis is quite severe.
  • You have medical problems that do not allow you to have this surgery.

Talk with your surgeon about the benefits and risks. Ask if your surgeon has experience with this type of surgery.

After the Procedure

People who have this surgery can have a shorter stay in the hospital and faster recovery. Ask if this procedure is a good choice for you.

Alternative Names

Small incision total hip replacement; MIS hip surgery

References

Harkess JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip. In: Canale ST, Beatty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 3.

Meneghini RM, Smits SA, Swinford RR, Bahamonde RE. A randomized, prospective study of 3 minimally invasive surgical approaches in total hip arthroplasty: comprehensive gait analysis. J Arthroplasty. 2008;23:68-73. PMID: 18722305 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18722305.

Update Date 7/13/2015

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