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Protein S blood test

Protein S is a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see how much of this protein you have in your blood.

How the Test is Performed

A blood sample is needed.

How to Prepare for the Test

Certain medicines can change blood test results:

  • Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you take.
  • Your provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. This may include drugs that prevent blood clots (blood thinners).
  • DO NOT stop or change your medicines without talking to your provider first.

How the Test will Feel

When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away.

Why the Test is Performed

You may need this test if you have an unexplained blood clot, or a family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with the function of this protein may cause blood clots to form in veins.

The test is also used to screen relatives of persons who are known to have protein S deficiency.

Sometimes, this test is done to find the cause of repeated miscarriages.

Normal Results

Normal values are 60% to 150% inhibition.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or may test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

A lack (deficiency) of protein S can lead to excess clotting. These clots tend to form in veins, not arteries.

A protein S deficiency may be inherited. It can also develop due to pregnancy or certain diseases, including:

Protein S level rises with age, but this does not cause any health problems.

Risks

There is very little risk involved with having your blood taken. Veins and arteries vary in size, so it may be harder to take a blood sample from one person than another.

Other risks associated with having blood drawn are slight, but may include:

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Fainting or feeling lightheaded
  • Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin)
  • Infection (a slight risk any time the skin is broken)

References

Anderson JA, Weitz JI. Hypercoagulable states. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 142.

Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Protein S, total and free - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures. 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:928-930.

Review Date 2/7/2017

Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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