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Sebaceous adenoma

A sebaceous adenoma is a noncancerous tumor of an oil-producing gland in the skin.

Information

A sebaceous adenoma is a small bump. There is most often only one, and it is usually found on the face, scalp, belly, back, or chest. It may be a sign of a serious internal disease.

If you have several small bumps of the sebaceous glands, this is called sebaceous hyperplasia. Such bumps are harmless in most cases, and often found on the face. They are not a sign of serious disease. They are more common with age. They may be treated if you do not like how they look.

Alternative Names

Sebaceous hyperplasia; Hyperplasia - sebaceous; Adenoma - sebaceous

References

Calonje E, Brenn T, Lazar AJ, Billings SD. Tumors and related lesions of the sebaceous glands. In: Calonje E, Brenn T, Lazar AJ, Billings SD, eds. McKee's Pathology of the Skin. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 32.

Dinulos JGH. Cutaneous manifestations of internal disease. In: Dinulos JGH, ed. Habif's Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide in Diagnosis and Therapy. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 26.

James WD, Elston DM, Treat JR, Rosenbach MA, Neuhaus IM. Epidermal nevi, neoplasms, and cysts. In: James WD, Elston DM, Treat JR, Rosenbach MA, Neuhaus IM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 29.

Review Date 10/10/2020

Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.