URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/1081.html

Mangosteen

What is it?

Mangosteen is a tropical fruit. The fruit, fruit juice, rind, twig, and bark are used as medicine.

Mangosteen is used for many conditions, but so far, there isn’t enough scientific evidence to determine whether or not it is effective for any of them.

Mangosteen is used for diarrhea, urinary tract infections (UTIs), gonorrhea, thrush, tuberculosis, menstrual disorders, cancer, osteoarthritis, and an intestinal infection called dysentery. It is also used for stimulating the immune system and improving mental health.

Some people apply mangosteen to the skin for eczema and other skin conditions.

Mangosteen is often eaten as a dessert fruit or made into jams. History reports that it was Queen Victoria’s favorite fruit.

These days, mangosteen juice is becoming a popular “health drink.” It is usually sold under the name “xango juice.” Some marketers claim that xango juice can treat diarrhea, menstrual problems, urinary tract infections, tuberculosis, and a variety of other conditions. However, there is no reliable scientific evidence to support these claims.

How effective is it?

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

The effectiveness ratings for MANGOSTEEN are as follows:

Insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for...

  • Dysentery.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs).
  • Gonorrhea.
  • Thrush.
  • Tuberculosis.
  • Eczema.
  • Menstrual disorders.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of mangosteen for these uses.

How does it work?

The fruit rind contains tannins. These might help for diarrhea. But there is no scientific information about whether mangosteen works for any medical condition.

Are there safety concerns?

There is not enough reliable information to know if mangosteen products are safe for use as medicines.

Special precautions & warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking mangosteen if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Mangosteen might slow blood clotting. Taking mangosteen might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Surgery: Mangosteen might slow blood clotting. Taking mangosteen might increase the risk of bleeding during or after surgery. Stop taking mangosteen 2 weeks before surgery.

Are there interactions with medications?

Moderate
Be cautious with this combination.
Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)
Mangosteen might slow blood clotting and increase bleeding time. Taking mangosteen along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dalteparin (Fragmin), dipyridamole (Persantine), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Are there interactions with herbs and supplements?

Herbs and supplements that might slow blood clotting
Mangosteen might increase the amount of time it takes for blood to clot. Taking it along with other herbs and supplements that slow blood clotting might slow blood clotting even more and might increase the risk of bleeding and bruising in some people. Some of these herbs include angelica, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, Panax ginseng, red clover, turmeric, willow, and others.

Are there interactions with foods?

There are no known interactions with foods.

What dose is used?

The appropriate dose of mangosteen depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for mangosteen. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Other names

Amibiasine, Fruit des Rois, Garcinia mangostana, Jus de Xango, Mang Cut, Manggis, Manggistan, Mangosta, Mangostan, Mangostán, Mangostana, Mangostanier, Mangostao, Mangostier, Mangoustanier, Mangouste, Mangoustier, Manguita, Meseter, Queen of Fruits, Sementah, Semetah, Xango, Xango Juice.

Methodology

To learn more about how this article was written, please see the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database methodology.

References

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Last reviewed - 02/15/2015