URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a614062.html

Peramivir Injection

pronounced as (per am' i vir)

Why is this medication prescribed?

Peramivir injection is used to treat some types of influenza infection ('flu') in people who have had symptoms of the flu for no longer than 2 days. Peramivir injection is in a class of medications called neuraminidase inhibitors. It works by stopping the spread of the flu virus in the body. Peramivir injection helps shorten the time that flu symptoms such as a stuffy or runny nose, sore throat, cough, muscle or joint aches, tiredness, headache, fever, and chills last. Peramivir injection will not prevent bacterial infections, which may occur as a complication of the flu.

How should this medicine be used?

Peramivir injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be given through a needle or catheter placed in your vein. It is usually injected into a vein for 15 to 30 minutes as a one-time dose by a doctor or nurse.

If your flu symptoms do not improve or get worse, call your doctor.

Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before receiving peramivir injection,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to peramivir injection, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in peramivir injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. If you become pregnant while receiving peramivir injection, call your doctor.
  • you should know that people, especially children and teenagers, who have the flu, and some receiving medications such as peramivir, may become confused, agitated, or anxious, and may behave strangely, have seizures or hallucinate (see things or hear voices that do not exist), or harm or kill themselves. If you have the flu, you, your family, or your caregiver should call the doctor right away if you become confused, behave abnormally, or think about harming yourself. Be sure that your family or caregiver knows which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.
  • ask your doctor if you should receive a flu vaccination each year. Peramivir injection does not take the place of a yearly flu vaccine. If you received or plan to receive the intranasal flu vaccine (FluMist; flu vaccine that is sprayed into the nose), you should tell your doctor before receiving peramivir injection. Peramivir injection may make the intranasal flu vaccine less effective if it is received up to 2 weeks after or up to 48 hours before the intranasal flu vaccine is given.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Peramivir injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms or those mentioned in the SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS section, call your doctor immediately:

  • rash, hives, or blisters on the skin
  • itching
  • swelling of the face or tongue
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • wheezing
  • hoarseness
  • hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)

Peramivir injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Brand names

  • Rapivab®
Last Revised - 02/15/2015