URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/podcast/transcript120814.html

NLM Director’s Comments Transcript

NIH MedlinePlus Magazine: 12/08/2014

Picture of Dr. Lindberg

Greetings from the National Library of Medicine and MedlinePlus.gov

Regards to all our listeners!

I'm Rob Logan, Ph.D. senior staff U.S. National Library of Medicine for Donald Lindberg, M.D, the Director of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Here is what's new this week in MedlinePlus.listen

The new edition of NIH MedlinePlus magazine covers back-to-school tips to boost kids health, type 2 diabetes, as well as information about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The cover features attorney Grace Anne Dorney Koppel and husband Ted Koppell, former host of ABC's Nightline. Ms. Koppel, who is the national spokesperson to raise awareness of COPD for NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, explains 25 million Americans have COPD. Yet, she explains only about half of COPD patients have been diagnosed and receive treatment.
Ms. Koppel notes about 66 percent (or two of every three ) COPD patients are women. She explains (and we quote) ‘COPD kills more women than breast cancer or ovarian cancer combined’ (end of quote). NIH MedlinePlus magazine adds COPD is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. and kills more than 130,000 Americans annually.

To improve public awareness and spur diagnosis, Ms. Koppel has worked with partners and donors to open Grace Anne Dorney Pulmonary Rehabilitation Clinics in several states. She explains the clinics (and we quote) ‘are intended to empower people to learn about the management of their disease, to exercise, while being monitored - and to gradually get their lives back’ (end of quote).

In a separate section, NIH MedlinePlus magazine explains COPD is a lung disease that makes it difficult to breathe. COPD encompasses emphysema and chronic bronchitis. NIH MedlinePlus magazine notes patients with COPD can ease their condition by: stopping smoking, avoiding exposure to dust, getting an annual flu shot, and regular visits with a health care provider.  

NIH MedlinePlus magazine also provides an overview of COPD including risk factors, symptoms, spirometry tests, and rehabilitation options. 

NIH MedlinePlus magazine additionally contains a special section about type 2 diabetes, with information about its risk factors. NIH MedlinePlus magazine explains type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease and occurs when the body does not make or use insulin well.

NIH MedlinePlus magazine reports some actions you can take to reduce type 2 diabetes include: be aware of your A1C (blood glucose or sugar) levels, blood pressure, and cholesterol. NIH MedlinePlus magazine suggests the better a type 2 diabetes patient manages all three, the more he or she reduces the risk of a heart attack, stroke, as well as other medical problems associated with the disease.

NIH MedlinePlus magazine provides a page with specific suggestions about managing type 2 diabetes. Some of these suggestions include: exercising 30 to 60 minutes most days of the week, as well as eating foods with less fat and salt - and with more fiber (such as whole-grain cereals, crackers, rice, or pasta).  

In addition, NIH MedlinePlus magazine contains a special section of health tips for kids returning to school this fall. NIH MedlinePlus magazine recommends kids receive four preventive vaccines. These are:

  • Tdap a booster shot to protect against tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough. This shot is recommended for kids ages 11-12 and for teens, ages 13-18, who have not previously received the vaccination.
  • MCV4 – which protects against meningococcal disease
  • HPV – which projects against some types of human papillomavirus that can cause cervical cancers later in life. This vaccine is given in three doses to boys and girls during a three month period recommended at ages 11-12
  • and an annual flu vaccine. 

NIH MedlinePlus magazine adds other tips that encourage kids to exercise and sleep more as well as eat healthier foods.

A special page in NIH MedlinePlus magazine also reports some innovative research in progress that is funded by NIH, including a microneedle patch that delivers vaccines painlessly (and does not require refrigeration) as well as a new, cartilage regeneration technique.

As always, NIH MedlinePlus magazine provides a helpful list of phone numbers (many of them a free call) to contact NIH’s array of institutes and centers.

NIH MedlinePlus magazine is distributed to physicians’ offices nationwide by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Friends of the National Library of Medicine. You can subscribe or find the latest edition online by clicking on ‘Magazine,’ which is on the bottom right side of MedlinePlus.gov’s home page.

Previous editions of NIH MedlinePlus magazine are available at the same site. A link to NIH MedlinePlus Salud, which provides other health information and resources in Spanish, is available there as well (see the top right of the page). The web version of NIH MedlinePlus magazine includes links that visually supplement the information in some articles.

Before I go, this reminder… MedlinePlus.gov is authoritative. It's free. We do not accept advertising …and is written to help you.

To find MedlinePlus.gov, just type ‘MedlinePlus.gov’ in any web browser, such as Firefox, Safari, Chrome, or Explorer.  To find the improved smartphone version of Mobile MedlinePlus.gov, just type ‘Mobile MedlinePlus’ in the same web browsers.

We encourage you to use MedlinePlus and please recommend it to your friends. MedlinePlus is available in English and Spanish. Some medical information is available in 43 other languages.

Your comments about this or any of our podcasts are always welcome. We welcome suggestions about future topics too!

Please email Dr. Lindberg anytime at: NLMDirector@nlm.nih.gov

That's NLMDirector (one word) @nlm.nih.gov

A written transcript of recent podcasts is available by typing 'Director's comments' in the search box on MedlinePlus.gov's home page.

The National Library of Medicine is one of 27 institutes and centers within the National Institutes of Health. The National Institutes of Health is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A disclaimer — the information presented in this program should not replace the medical advice of your physician. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any disease without first consulting with your physician or other health care provider.

It was nice to be with you. I look forward to meeting you here next week.