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To Your Health: NLM update Transcript

Flu shot helps type 2 diabetes patients: 09/26/2016

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Greetings from the National Library of Medicine and MedlinePlus.gov

Regards to all our listeners!

I'm Rob Logan, Ph.D., senior staff, U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM).

Here is what's new this week in To Your Health - a consumer health oriented podcast from NLM - that helps you use MedlinePlus to follow up on weekly topics.

A flu shot may reduce the risk of death and decrease hospitalizations for adults with type 2 diabetes, finds a recent study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

In a seven year study of more than 124,500 British adults with type 2 diabetes, deaths declined 24 percent for the participants who received a seasonal flu vaccine compared to those who did not obtain a flu shot.

Similarly, the study's seven authors report hospital admissions for three illnesses frequently associated with type 2 diabetes declined significantly among participants who received a flu shot compared to adults who did not get a flu vaccine.

More specifically, hospital admissions for a stroke comparatively were 30 percent lower among the participants with type 2 diabetes who received a flu shot. Hospital admissions for heart failure comparatively were 22 percent lower among the participants with type 2 diabetes who received a flu shot. Hospital admissions for pneumonia or influenza comparatively were 15 percent lower among participants with type 2 diabetes who received a flu shot.

The authors write (and we quote): 'This study has shown that people with type 2 diabetes may derive substantial benefits from current vaccines, including protection against hospital admission for some major cardiovascular outcomes' (end of quote).

The authors add (and we quote): 'These findings underline the importance of influenza vaccination as part of comprehensive secondary prevention in this high-risk population' (end of quote).

The authors used the British Clinical Practice Research Database to assess differences among adults with type 2 diabetes from 2003 to 2010. The authors suggest the research is distinguished by both its large number of participants as well as its findings.

Meanwhile, some basic facts about type 2 diabetes - from the American Diabetes Association - is available within the 'start here' section of MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page.

The National Center for Farmworker Health and Consumers Union of U.S. also provide a well-written primer about type 2 diabetes treatment within the 'treatment and therapies' section of MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page.

MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page additionally provides links to the latest pertinent journal research articles, which are available in the 'journal articles' section. Links to relevant clinical trials that may be occurring in your area are available within the 'clinical trials' section. You can sign up to receive updates about type 2 diabetes as they become available on MedlinePlus.gov.

To find MedlinePlus.gov's diabetes type 2 health topic page, please type 'type 2 diabetes' in the search box on MedlinePlus.gov's home page, then, click on 'diabetes type 2 (National Library of Medicine).' MedlinePlus.gov also has health topic pages devoted to the flu shot as well as type 1 diabetes.

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It was nice to be with you. Please join us here next week and here's to your health!